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Muth’s Truths: May 5, 2017

Remember back in March when the fake news media declared President Donald Trump had “failed” in his promise to repeal ObamaCare when House Republicans couldn’t agree on a plan.

At the time, I pointed out that it wasn’t a failure so much as a learning experience; that the president would go back to the drawing board and try again…

Just as Thomas Edison tried 10,000 times to invent the light bulb before he finally succeeded.

Trump didn’t need to find 10,000 ways that wouldn’t work in the House. Only one.  And now on to the Senate…

Expect a few more “failures” before all is said and done.  But it will get done.

Cheers.

Dr. Chuck Muth, PsD
Professor of Psephology (homeschooled)
Nevada’s #1 Irritator of Liberals and RINOs

P.S.  After passing the ObamaCare repeal bill in the House yesterday, dozens of Democrat members childishly broke into song on the House floor.  “Na, na, na, na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye,” they sang, predicting the vote would cost the GOP its majority in 2018.

And we’re supposed to take these people seriously?

HEADLINES

NEVADA NEWS & VIEWS

* Years ago, fiscal conservatives warned Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval NOT to expand Medicaid under ObamaCare.  The writing was on the wall.  The feds were eventually gonna stop paying the additional cost, the state budget would explode and Nevada taxpayers were gonna be left on the hook to pay for it.

Sandoval ignored those warnings and was the first Republican governor to expand Medicaid.

Now the chickens are coming home to roost.  House Republicans, including Nevada Rep. Mark Amodei, on Thursday, voted to repeal ObamaCare – which is bankrupting the nation, families and American businesses – including Sandoval’s ill-advised Medicaid expansion.  The bill now moves to the Senate.

Unfortunately, Nevada U.S. Sen. Dean Heller has taken a position in opposition to the ObamaCare repeal, citing cuts to the Medicaid expansion that never should have been implemented in the first place.  Let’s hope he eventually sees the light and gets with the program.

* Speaking of Heller, the Democrats are reportedly having a dickens of a time settling on a candidate to challenge him in 2018.

Uber-liberal Rep. Dina Titus wants to make the run.  But word on the street is that freshman U.S. Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto-Reid and her handler, former Sen. Harry Reid, don’t want Titus and are telling her she can’t run.

Instead, they’re pushing for former state Treasurer “Calamity” Kate Marshall (D-UC Berkley), who famously went down in flames at the ballot box in a special election bid for Congress against Republican Rep. Mark Amodei in 2011, and then lost her bid for Secretary of State to Republican Barbara Cegavske in 2014.

Heller, who was a “Never Trump” guy in 2016, is vulnerable in a general election if he can’t shore up his conservative base.  The best thing he has going for him right now is the chaos and in-fighting among D’s to find a viable opponent.

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FAMOUS LAST WORDS

“I believe the Republican Party must be a big, big tent. Pro-choice, pro-life, pro-drug legalization, prohibitionists, and differing views on immigration all fit into the Conservative/Libertarian movement. But the guiding principle that binds us all together is our belief in limited, smaller government. So, perhaps foolishly, I expect Republicans to be steadfast in opposing tax increases.” – Jon Caldara of the Independence Institute

“States should be able to set their own levels of taxing and spending, but I see no reason why a Walmart cashier in Tennessee (which has no state income tax and low property taxes) should be subsidizing a hedge fund mogul in New York or a studio executive in Hollywood. It’s fine if blue states want to have higher state and local tax rates, as they do, but they shouldn’t be encouraged to do so by federal tax giveaways.” – USA Today columnist Glenn Reynolds on tax reform proposal that would eliminate the tax deduction for state income and sales taxes